Crypto News 

Coinbase Wallet Users Can Back Up Encrypted Keys on Google Drive and iCloud

“In the statement, Coinbase states that allowing users to upload their keys to a cloud provides a safeguard against lost keys, will will help them avoid losing funds should the keys be misplaced” writes Aaron Wood for cointelegraph.com. Owners of ‘user-controlled wallets’ like Coinbase Wallet sometimes lose their devices or fail to backup their 12 word recovery phrase in a safe place, thus losing their funds forever.” Now, users of Coinbase Wallet can store an encrypted copy of the recovery phrase on their cloud accounts.The announcement notes: “The private keys…

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News Platforms 

Crypto exchange can’t repay $190M because the CEO died with only password

“The Canadian cryptocurrency exchange QuadrigaCX owes its customers about $190 million, or 249 million Canadian dollars, according to CoinDesk” writes Trista Kelley for businessinsider.com. That’s a big problem for investors because the exchange’s founder, who had encrypted access to the money, died last year. The exchange is considering selling off its operating platform to refund its users, and “multiple parties” are interested, CoinDesk said, citing the filing.Robertson said the exchange’s new directors voted to “temporarily pause” the platform on January 26. Source: businessinsider.com

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News 

Marriott Concedes 5M Passport Numbers Lost to Hackers Were Not Encrypted

“An additional 20.3 million passport numbers were kept in encrypted files, which would require a master encryption key to read” reports nytimes.com. Marriott said for the first time that 5.25 million passport numbers were kept in the Starwood system in plain, unencrypted data files — meaning they were easily read by anyone inside the reservation system.It is unclear how many of those involved American passports, and how many come from other countries. “There is no evidence that the unauthorized third party accessed the master encryption key needed to decrypt the…

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News 

Marriott Concedes 5 Million Passport Numbers Lost to Hackers Were Not Encrypted

“An additional 20.3 million passport numbers were kept in encrypted files, which would require a master encryption key to read” reports nytimes.com. Marriott said for the first time that 5.25 million passport numbers were kept in the Starwood system in plain, unencrypted data files — meaning they were easily read by anyone inside the reservation system.It is unclear how many of those involved American passports, and how many come from other countries. “There is no evidence that the unauthorized third party accessed the master encryption key needed to decrypt the…

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News 

Marriott Now Says 5.25 Million Passport Numbers Accessed in November Data Breach

“Crucially, included among the compromised data were 5.25 million unencrypted passport numbers” writes Chris Morris for fortune.com. While the same hackers also stole 20.3 encrypted passport numbers and 8.6 million encrypted debit and credit cards, Marriott says it has no evidence the thieves were able to decrypt that information.Marriott only learned of the data theft on Nov. 19, after hackers had accessed records since 2014. Source: fortune.com

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AUD News 

Australia passes bill to force tech firms to hand over encrypted data

“When it becomes law, Australia will be one of the first nations to impose broad access requirements on technology firms, after many years of lobbying by intelligence and law enforcement agencies in many countries, particularly the so-called Five Eyes nations” writes Min Read for reuters.com. SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australia’s parliament on Thursday passed a bill to force tech firms such as Alphabet Inc’s Google (GOOGL.O), Facebook FB.N and Apple (AAPL.O) to give police access to encrypted data, the most far-reaching such requirements imposed by a western country.The bill provides for…

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AUD News 

Google, Apple, Facebook face world-first encryption laws in Australia

“Australia passed new laws that allow law enforcement to access encrypted messages, legislation that leading tech companies, including Google, Facebook and Twitter, have all opposed” writes Claire Reilly for cnet.com. They say law enforcement needs access to these services — and greater regulation of tech companies broadly — to ensure public safety.The new laws come as tech companies and governments around the world debate the importance of encryption amid a changing national security landscape.Governments and law enforcement agencies across the US, Europe and other western nations argue terrorists and criminals…

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AUD News 

Australia poised to force tech firms to hand over encrypted data

“Apple had previously, in a public submission to lawmakers, said demanding access to encrypted data would necessitate weakening the encryption and increase the risk of hacking” reports businessinsider.com. The laws, staunchly opposed by the tech giants since Australia is seen as a test case as other nations explore similar rules, provide for fines up to A$10 million ($7.3 million) for failing to give authorities access to private data.The government has said the proposed laws are needed to counter terror attacks and organized crime and that security agencies would need to…

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News 

Marriott data breach impacts 500 million Starwood hotel guests

“Marriott discovered a data breach that could have affected up to 500 million guests, the company said Friday” writes Sean Keane for cnet.com. Firefox warning: It’ll let you know if the website you’re visiting suffered a data breach.For around 327 million of those impacted, that data included names, addresses, phone numbers, emails, passport numbers and travel details.An internal investigation found that its network was first breached in 2014, and that “an unauthorized party had copied and encrypted information.”.  Source: cnet.com

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News 

Apple says ‘dangerous’ Australian encryption laws put ‘everyone at risk’

“The Australian parliament is currently considering new encryption laws that would require tech giants such as Apple, Facebook, WhatsApp and more to provide access to encrypted communications to law enforcement for policing crime” reports cnet.com. Australia’s conservative federal government has insisted that the laws would not require tech companies to build so-called “back doors” into encrypted communications.Apple also says the proposed Australian laws could force the company to break the laws of other jurisdictions such as the US and Europe, and compromise the privacy of users around the world.Whether it’s…

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