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Avista Healthcare shares rise on deal to acquire Organogenesis

“Avista shares rose 5.4% after hours, following a 0.1% decline to finish the regular session at $10.11” writes Wallace Witkowski for marketwatch.com. AHPA, -0.11% shares rose in the extended session Friday after the company said it planned to acquire Organogenesis Inc.Avista said the deal will be funded through a combination of cash, stock and debt, and is expected to close by the end of the year.Canton, Mass.-based Organogenesis is a regenerative medicine company that makes products for wound treatment and surgery.The combined company is expected to have an enterprise value…

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Nevada receives application for Trump-backed healthcare plans

“A type of health insurance plan encouraged by President Trump, in which workers band together to get coverage, has applied to cover residents in Nevada” reports washingtonexaminer.com. The plans, known as “association health plans,” have been framed by the White House as a cheaper option for insurance coverage than Obamacare.Critics and pro-Obamacare groups have warned consumers that the plans may not be as extensive as those offered under the healthcare law. [Trump: Obamacare to be gone ‘pretty soon’] The latest plan was filed by the Chamber of Commerce to sell…

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Why big media companies are branching into health care

“Now, Comcast is working on a 50/50 joint venture with Philadelphia-based health insurer Independence Health Group, the parent of Independence Blue Cross” writes Sarah Toy for marketwatch.com. The biggest issue facing digital health platforms is the lack of engagement.In some ways, media companies are uniquely positioned to tackle the space, said Dan D’Orazio, CEO of health-care research firm Sage Growth Partners.CMCSA, +2.07% which already provides broadband and networking solutions to health-care organizations, has been looking to expand its reach in the health-care space for some time.Read: Over 5 million U.S.…

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Crossover Health, a little-known startup that got a big boost when Apple picked it to run medical clinics for staff, is ramping up big time

“While Apple decided earlier this year to build its own clinic in Cupertino, Crossover still works with other Apple employees in locations outside headquarters” writes Lydia Ramsey for businessinsider.com. One perk Apple landed on back in 2011: on-site health clinics.Symantec and the other clients Crossover works with aren’t alone in looking for new ways to get a more direct grip on the healthcare their employees consume.The world’s biggest tech company chose to work with a little-known startup called Crossover Health to operate its medical clinics in its Cupertino headquarters which…

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India is rolling out a healthcare plan for half a billion people. But are there enough doctors?

“Even with the new public health care plan, however, India simply does not have the doctors and hospitals to serve so many hundreds of millions” reports washingtonpost.com. First announced in February, the National Health Protection Mission will give poor families health coverage of up to $7,100 every year — which could go a long way in reducing crippling health care costs for half a billion people.The shortages in the public sector mean that around 70 percent of Indians turn to private health care when they are unwell, Bhushan said.India spends…

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US investors are pouring hundreds of millions into a healthcare company that doesn’t take insurance and lists its prices like a ‘McDonald’s menu’

“And in 2014, investment firm Bain Capital acquired Grupo NotreDame Intermedica, taking the company public four years later” writes Lydia Ramsey for businessinsider.com. Consulta, a Brazilian company that provides doctor’s visits and healthcare services for set fees — no insurance needed.”When done well, it’s second to none,” Harris said about the public health system.In 2012, Minnesota-based UnitedHealth Group bought Amil, the largest healthcare company in Brazil. Source: businessinsider.com Share This:

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Americans looking for long overdue healthcare cost relief must speak out in favor of these new plans with their voices and their wallets.

“Can short-term and association-style health plans, recently permitted by the Trump administration, help reduce healthcare expenses for ordinary Americans?” reports washingtonexaminer.com. Today, the average worker pays almost $1,400 more per year for employer-sponsored health insurance than he did five years ago.Currently, healthcare is prohibitively expensive, with the average household spending at least 7 percent of take-home pay on health insurance alone.In 2014, rising prices forced more Americans to substitute their expensive complete coverage for short-term insurance. Source: washingtonexaminer.com Share This:

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We spoke with the woman shaking up GM’s health plans, and what she said should terrify health insurers

“One of the strategies the venture could take is to create its own alternative health plan built around their priorities, much like GM’s doing” writes Lydia Ramsey for businessinsider.com. Instead of using a health insurer, GM negotiated the terms of its plan with the hospital system directly, an agreement dubbed a “direct-to-employer” contract.Ultimately, Savageau answers to GM’s chief financial officer, who asks what GM’s doing to manage their healthcare spending.But when it comes to a health insurance company setting up the plan, it might have goals that aren’t going to…

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Why women are more worried about their health care

“Women typically also earn less than men, Tepper pointed out, making them more vulnerable to higher costs when it comes to health insurance” reports moneyish.com. Women feel worse about certain health-care concerns than men do, according to a new survey from Bankrate.com.Women feel worse about certain health-care concerns than men do, according to a new Bankrate report. Source: moneyish.com Share This:

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The social isolation epidemic in rural America

“In a recent national survey, just 18 percent of rural seniors exhibited no signs of social isolation” reports washingtonexaminer.com. More than a third of respondents, on the other hand, suffer at least three of the nine key social isolation indicators.In fact, social isolation increases total risk of premature death by up to 50 percent.Now is the time to challenge ourselves as a nation and reverse the trend of social isolation.Not surprisingly, older Americans living outside our metropolitan centers recognize the pitfalls of social isolation. Source: washingtonexaminer.com Share This:

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